Sweet potato recipe – how to maximise your fibre intake | Super Synbiotics
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Sweet potato recipe – how to maximise your fibre intake

Sweet potatoes are, just like most other root vegetables, rich in vitamins, minerals and not least; fibre. To optimise fibre intake, however, it is important to cook and eat these root vegetables in the right way. Read on for our recipe for stuffed sweet potatoes.

Sweet potato – rich in antioxidants

The sweet potato is a root fruit that is both flavourful, colourful and full of nutrients. Sweet potatoes are, for example, rich in antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and beta-carotene, which is a precursor to vitamin A. The body converts beta-carotene into vitamin A, but only when needed. A serving of sweet potatoes provides more than the daily requirement of beta-carotene and vitamin A, which is necessary, among other things, to prevent eye-sight degeneration.

Sweet potatoes also have a lower glycemic index (GI) than regular potatoes, which means that they have a milder effect on blood glucose levels and thus constitute a more even source of energy throughout the day.

Let cool to maximise fibre content

Fibres come in various forms. Some of these give the intestines more to work with, while other types of fibre are needed to feed the benign intestinal bacteria.

Sweet potatoes contain about 3 grams of fibre per 100 grams and the majority of these are so-called soluble fibres that the intestinal bacteria like to use as an energy source. However, the amount of fibre decreases when the sweet potatoes are cooked and heated, which means that their glycemic index increases. There is a simple trick you can use to avoid this – let the potatoes cool before eating. When the sweet potato (also applies to other root vegetables) cools, the useful fibres are regenerated through a process called recrystallisation. Perfect for those who want to optimise their fibre intake and avoid affecting their blood glucose levels!

Baked sweet potatoes with a green topping

Sweet potatoes can be cooked in a variety of ways. One of our favourite ways is to bake them in the oven and then top them with various green leaves and tasty vegetables. Feel free to try other combinations than those provided in the recipe below. Avocados can for example be replaced with hummus and arugula with spinach leaves – try different types of vegetables to maximise the nutritional variety of your diet.

Recipe

(2 servings)

2 sweet potatoes

Topping:

1 avocado

2 handfuls of arugula

Sun-dried tomatoes

Olives

Sprouts

Sunflower seeds

 

Rinse and scrub the potatoes in cold water. Place the potatoes on a plate and cook in the oven at 200 degrees for about 40 minutes. Use a stick or fork to determine if the potatoes are done. When the potatoes are done – take them out of the oven and let cool for at least 15 minutes. Cut the potatoes lengthwise and fill with mashed avocado, arugula, shredded sun-dried tomatoes, chopped olives, sprouts and sunflower seeds. Can be eaten on their own or along with any protein source.

 

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